Bartholomew F. Fair papers, 1906-1966 (MC 24)

Bartholomew F. Fair (circa 1963)

After receiving his doctorate in canon law from Catholic University, Bartholomew F. Fair became a professor at St. Charles Seminary (Overbrook, Pa.) from 1946 until his appointment as pastor of St. Raymond of Penafort parish in 1967. During this time, he also served as assistant pastor at several other parishes within the Philadelphia Archdiocese. He was also a member of the Commission for Sacred Liturgy and served as Spiritual Director for the Children of Mary at the Academy of the Sisters of Notre Dame de Namur in Rittenhouse Square.

Fair served as president of the American Catholic Historical Society from 1957 until 1966. He was then named to the newly created post of executive director. He had been active in the Society for over 23 years, also serving as its librarian and curator. He supervised the move of the ACHS to its present headquarters at 263 South Fourth Street and was also responsible for moving the Society’s collection to its present location at St. Charles Seminary.

This collection contains correspondence and writings, including Fair’s dissertation, as well as other miscellaneous materials. Some minutes, annual reports, and treasurer’s reports of the American Catholic Historical Society are also included. Some of the correspondence and writings are in Italian and Latin.

2 boxes, 0.8 linear ft.

James F. Connelly papers, 1790-1974 (MC 67)

James F. Connelly (1955-), ordained in 1955, spent the majority of his career as a member of the faculty at St. Charles Borromeo Seminary (Overbrook, Pa.) where he taught church history. He also served as Vice-Rector of the Seminary’s Theology Division from 1968 to 1970.

circa 1976

A trained historian, Connelly centered his scholarship and writings on the history of the Archdiocese and St. Charles Seminary. He authored two works, St. Charles Seminary, Philadelphia : a history of the Theological Seminary of Saint Charles Borromeo, Overbrook, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, 1832-1979 and The visit of Archbishop Gaetano Bedini to the United States of America, June 1853-February 1854. Connelly also edited The History of the Archdiocese of Philadelphia, published in 1976. He also contributed articles to the New Catholic Encyclopedia.

Connelly served as the first full-time secretary to Cardinal Krol. He was also very involved with the Eucharistic Congress held in Philadelphia in 1976 as well as with the canonization ceremonies for John Neumann. For the latter, he chaired the Liturgy Committee, which was responsible for all the ceremonies surrounding the canonization in both Rome and Philadelphia, and for supplying the booklets, liturgical texts, and prayers used during the ceremonies.

The collection largely contains Connelly’s research notes and writings that cover a multitude of topics, though a significant amount deal with the history of Philadelphia and Pennsylvania, specifically the history of Catholicism in the Philadelphia and surrounding dioceses, Cardinal Krol’s tenure, and St. Charles Borromeo Seminary. A good deal of research notes were most likely gathered for his published works. A significant amount of materials also relate to the work Connelly did for Neumann’s canonization ceremonies. There are daily log entries of his time at the Seminary from about 1964 to 1978. Correspondence, research notes, published materials, ephemera, and mixed media materials, such as cassette tapes, are also included.

23 boxes, 9.2 linear ft.

Walter George Smith papers, 1836-1933 (MC 47)

Walter George Smith (1854-1924) was a prominent Philadelphia attorney. A devout Catholic, Smith worked and lectured extensively for the anti-divorce cause. Among other activities, he was involved in advancing the causes of uniform state laws, was an appointed member of the Board of Indian Commissioners, a Manager of the Drexel Institute, and President of the American Bar Association.

The collection contains correspondence, including family correspondence; diaries, journals and travel logs; speeches, addresses, published and unpublished writings. Scrapbooks, memorabilia, and obituaries are also included.

A significant portion of the materials concern Smith’s resignation as a trustee of the University of Pennsylvania- a position he had held for 18 years- which made national headlines. Smith left in 1909 due to his opposition of the appointment of Dr. J.P. Lichtenberger as an associate professor at the Wharton School. Among other things, Smith was vehemently opposed to Lichtenberger’s stance on divorce.

While Walter Smith’s writings and papers make up the majority of the collection, there is also material relating to other Smith family members, including his sister, Helen Grace Smith, and Thomas Kilby Smith.

2.8 linear feet ; 7 boxes

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