Catholic University of America records, 1947-1955 (MC 35)

The majority of the collection is minutes as well as reports of the minutes of Board of Trustee meetings, financial committee materials, and materials concerning the National Shrine of the Immaculate Conception.

2 boxes, 0.8 linear ft.

James F. Connelly papers, 1790-1974 (MC 67)

James F. Connelly (1955-), ordained in 1955, spent the majority of his career as a member of the faculty at St. Charles Borromeo Seminary (Overbrook, Pa.) where he taught church history. He also served as Vice-Rector of the Seminary’s Theology Division from 1968 to 1970.

circa 1976

A trained historian, Connelly centered his scholarship and writings on the history of the Archdiocese and St. Charles Seminary. He authored two works, St. Charles Seminary, Philadelphia : a history of the Theological Seminary of Saint Charles Borromeo, Overbrook, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, 1832-1979 and The visit of Archbishop Gaetano Bedini to the United States of America, June 1853-February 1854. Connelly also edited The History of the Archdiocese of Philadelphia, published in 1976. He also contributed articles to the New Catholic Encyclopedia.

Connelly served as the first full-time secretary to Cardinal Krol. He was also very involved with the Eucharistic Congress held in Philadelphia in 1976 as well as with the canonization ceremonies for John Neumann. For the latter, he chaired the Liturgy Committee, which was responsible for all the ceremonies surrounding the canonization in both Rome and Philadelphia, and for supplying the booklets, liturgical texts, and prayers used during the ceremonies.

The collection largely contains Connelly’s research notes and writings that cover a multitude of topics, though a significant amount deal with the history of Philadelphia and Pennsylvania, specifically the history of Catholicism in the Philadelphia and surrounding dioceses, Cardinal Krol’s tenure, and St. Charles Borromeo Seminary. A good deal of research notes were most likely gathered for his published works. A significant amount of materials also relate to the work Connelly did for Neumann’s canonization ceremonies. There are daily log entries of his time at the Seminary from about 1964 to 1978. Correspondence, research notes, published materials, ephemera, and mixed media materials, such as cassette tapes, are also included.

23 boxes, 9.2 linear ft.

Joseph M. Corrigan papers, 1896-1942 (MC 25)

A prominent orator and preacher, Bishop Joseph M. Corrigan, D.D. served as the sixth rector of the Catholic University of America, Washington, D.C. from 1936 until his sudden death in June 1942. He was also rector of and a professor at St. Charles Seminary (Wynnewood, Pa.) from 1918 to 1936.

After his ordination in Rome in 1903, Corrigan returned to Philadelphia where he played a very active role in the city’s religious and social affairs. He served as assistant pastor in several parishes, and for several years was in charge of the Madonna House and settlement work among Italians. Following his parish work, Corrigan was named Diocesan Director of Catholic Charities and was placed in charge of the Catholic Children’s Bureau.

Corrigan was also a member of the board of directors of the Community Council of Philadelphia (the Welfare Federation). He served as state chaplain of the Pennsylvania State Council of the Knights of Columbus, and was also a judge of the matrimonial court and moderator of the priests’ vigilance committee. Corrigan also served as the first retreat master of the Philadelphia Laymen’s Weekend Retreat League, also known as the Men of Malvern.

The same year that he became rector of St. Charles, Corrigan was made a domestic prelate by Pope Pius XI. His elevation to the episcopacy came in 1940.

This collection contains correspondence as well as some of Corrigan’s sermons, speeches, and radio addresses, and a few photographs. Much of the collection includes ephemera, specifically newspaper clippings, relating to Corrigan’s endeavors and achievements, which are contained in several personal scrapbooks. Also included are materials concerning Catholic University, including a notebook documenting Corrigan’s schedule during his time as rector as well as some items relating to Corrigan’s involvement with the Knights of Columbus. Items relating to Corrigan’s death, such as sympathy letters to his sister and newspaper clippings, are also included. [3 boxes, 3 scrapbooks, 2.6 linear ft.]

Patrick Coad family papers, 1798-1880 (MC 37)

Patrick Coad, undated

Patrick Coad (1783-1872), an Irish immigrant who settled in Philadelphia, was the first patentee of a graduated galvanic battery with insulated poles. Touting his battery among other uses as an instrument that helped cure various diseases, Coad’s invention attracted a good deal of attention within the scientific and medical communities. A teacher whose interests focused on medicine and the sciences, Coad also traveled throughout Pennsylvania and the surrounding area as a lecturer on the natural sciences.

The collection includes Coad’s correspondence, his lecture and medical notes, and ephemera, such as newspaper clippings, pamphlets and broadsides, publicizing his galvanic battery and lectures. Several of Coad’s family members are also documented through correspondence, ephemera, and estate items, including his son Joseph R. Coad (1829-1868), a prominent Philadelphia physician. A family scrapbook with miscellaneous materials is also included.

2 boxes, 1.5 linear ft.

*Materials in this collection have been digitized and can be viewed at the Digital Library @ Villanova University.

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